Annual tenant rent reviews

We review rents annually for residents living in our permanent rented housing or care and support homes. Learn more about what this means for you below. 

Rent review 

From April 2020, most social housing rents have increased by CPI+1% of the existing rent each year. The increase applies to the rent element of your total rent charge and not the service charge or personal charges.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a figure used to measure inflation. The previous September’s CPI is used to calculate rent increases. In September 2022, CPI was 10.1%. Therefore your rent this year will increase by up to 11.1% (10.1% + 1%).

For 2023/24, rent increases for social housing tenants in our general needs homes will be limited to 7% in line with the cap set nationally. We are also capping rent increases for shared owners at 7%.

The 7% cap means that rent increases for most of our residents are significantly lower than they would have been had they been based on inflation rates in September 2022 as is normal.

Rents for residents in care and support services are not covered by the cap and will increase in line with the usual formula set by our regulator of consumer price index (CPI) + 1%.

Although the levels of increase vary, we appreciate that any rise is unwelcome, especially given ongoing cost-of-living pressures. Unfortunately, high inflation has also driven up our costs, which means we need to increase rents to ensure we can continue to make improvements to homes and services and manage our properties well.

What this means for you 

Depending on which type of rent you pay, the rent review will affect you differently. Please select the sort of rent you pay below. 

  • Social (assured) rent

    There are two types of social tenancy rents: assured rent and fair rent. Read more about how these rents are set. In both cases, the total amount you pay is made up of rent plus any service charges, if applicable. 

    Changes to your rent 

    If you're paying assured rent, your rent will increase in 2023-24 by CPI+1% (11.1%), or may be capped to 7%. The increase will be applied to your weekly or monthly rental charge only. Service charges and personal service charges are not included in the calculation of the new rent.  

    If your rent is reviewed at a different time in the year, other than April, the same increase formula will still apply but from the date your rent is due for a rent change. 

    An example of an assured rent review of 11.1% may look as follows: 

    Example 

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 11.1% = £16.65 

    £166.65 

    Service charge 

    £ 20.00 

    + 10% = £2.00 

    £ 22.00 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total weekly rent 

    £180.00 

    Increase £19.15 

    £199.15 

    An example of an assured rent review of 7% may look as follows:  

    Example 

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 7% = £10.50 

    £160.50 

    Service charge 

    £ 20.00 

    + 10% = £2.00 

    £ 22.00 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total weekly rent 

    £180.00 

    Increase £13.00 

    £193.00 

     Note: The examples above are only for illustration purposes. Your actual weekly or monthly rent and service charge may be different. 

  • Affordable rent

    If you pay affordable rent, the total amount you pay is inclusive of service charges. Read more about how these rents are set 

    Your initial rent will not exceed 80% of the formula rent for your property and will increase in 2023-24 by CPI+1% (11.1%), or may be capped to 7%. If you are on a fixed-term tenancy, at the end of the fixed-term period your rent will be re-assessed.  

    Example rent review calculation at 11.1%: 

     

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 11.1% = £16.65 

    £166.65 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total amount payable 

    £160.00 

    Increase £17.15 

    £177.15 

    Example rent review calculation at 7%: 

     

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 7% = £10.50 

    £160.50 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total amount payable 

    £160.00 

    Increase £11.00 

    £171.00 

    Note: The examples above are only for illustration purposes. Your actual weekly or monthly rent and service charge may be different. 

  • Social (fair) rent

    The maximum fair rent we can charge on your home is the lowest of either the formula rent or at a level set by the Valuation Office Agency (VOA). The formula rent is calculated every year for your property and is based on things like average earnings and the value of the property. Every two years we ask the VOA to review the maximum rent level for your property.

    Your rent will increase on the anniversary of the last rent increase, and in 2023-24 will be by CPI+1% (11.1%), or may be capped to 7%.  

    We will never charge you more than the maximum registered rent level we have on record for your home. For more information, you can contact the VOA by telephoning 0300 0501 501. 

    An example of a fair rent review of 11.1% may look as follows: 

    Example 

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 11.1% = £16.65 

    £166.65 

    Service charge 

    £ 20.00 

    + 10% = £2.00 

    £ 22.00 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total weekly rent 

    £180.00 

    Increase £19.15 

    £199.15 

    An example of a fair rent review of 7% may look as follows: 

    Example 

    Before review 

    Annual review 

    After review 

    Rent 

    £150.00 

    + 7% = £10.50 

    £160.50 

    Service charge 

    £ 20.00 

    + 10% = £2.00 

    £ 22.00 

    Personal charges 

    £ 10.00 

    + 5% = £0.50 

    £ 10.50 

    Total weekly rent 

    £180.00 

    Increase £13.00 

    £193.00 

     Note: The examples above are only for illustration purposes. Your actual weekly or monthly rent and service charge may be different. 

     

 Your questions answered 

  • I am on Housing Benefit, what do I do?

    You must immediately supply the Housing Benefit department with a copy of your rent increase letter. Depending on the Local Authority, you will be able to do this via the local authority website or by handing it in at the council offices. Please check with your local benefit office how they would like to receive this.

    Intentionally failing to report a change in your circumstances that entitles you to less benefit can constitute fraud.

     

  • I am on Universal Credit, what do I do?

    You must report your rent increase via your online journal BUT you will not be able to do this until the date that the increase takes effect (on 1st April for monthly rents or Monday 3rd April for weekly rents)

    A task should appear in your ‘to do’ list to enable you to report this change, you should report the change via this ‘to do’ on the date that the rent increases (or as soon as possible after)

    If your Universal Credit claim is a telephone claim and you don’t have an online account you can call the Universal Credit service centre on 0800 328 5644.

  • What happens to my rent if I move?

    If you choose to move to another property, you will pay the advertised rent for that property. This information will be included in the advert. Please contact your housing officer via MyAccount for more information on transfers or mutual exchanges, or read about moving home.

  • Can I appeal against my rent review?

    If you think we have calculated your rent incorrectly or if you have any questions, you can appeal by contacting your housing officer via My Account. 

    If you still believe that your rent has not been calculated correctly and want to submit a formal appeal, you can contact the First-tier Tribunal (Property Chamber). The tribunal will not accept cases based on the target rent level or on your personal or financial circumstances. A formal appeal must be raised before the start date of your new rent. This date still applies even if you contact us directly first.

  • What happens if I don't pay my rent?

    As part of our new ways of working we’ve introduced a system that will automatically notify you if your rent account has fallen into arrears and an expected payment has not been made. To make the process of paying your rent easier, our notifications will also provide a link for you to register with the new online account as well as the contact details for your housing officer. This new service allows us to notify you about any debt more quickly than we’re able to at present and will reduce the chance of your rent arrears reaching a point at which they cannot be cleared - sign up for your online account here.

    If you do not pay your rent or service charge, or if you fail to keep to an arrangement to pay your arrears, we will take legal action, which could result in you losing your home.

    Falling behind with your payments may also lead to the following problems:

    • A court order can affect your credit rating and you may not be able to borrow money
    • You will have to pay the cost of any court hearing and associated solicitor's fees
    • If you are a tenant looking to transfer, the process may be affected by rent arrears
    • We will not allow any mutual exchange to go ahead until you have paid the arrears
    • If you lose your home, your local council may refuse to re-house you on the grounds that you have made yourself 'intentionally homeless'
    • You will still have to repay the arrears even after you have left
    • Banks, building societies or other lending agencies can ask us for references on your payments; a poor reference may affect your eligibility for a mortgage or other loan.

    If you have any concerns about paying your rent or service charge please discuss them immediately with your housing officer so they can be resolved as soon as possible. You can also read more about benefits and money in our budgeting advice section.

 Don't see what you're looking for below? You can learn more about rent, service charge and other payments you pay, in our rent and service charge FAQs section.